Caylee's Catches

Book reviews, musings and interesting catches

My Luncheon at Feast of the Hare – Recipes — November 16, 2007

My Luncheon at Feast of the Hare – Recipes

Hiya all,

Here are the recipes I used for my lunch at Hare.

 

Civet of Hare[1]

Im cheating a little here and scanning the recipe rather than typing it.


(My Note: I didnt use the organ meats as I didnt see the point.)


[1] Libro della Cocina
Anonimo Toscano, late 14th c
E. Faccioli, Arte della cucina, Milano 1966
 
Note: The editor (Faccioli) considers this manuscript to be early 15thc. He goes on to say that that he fundamentally relies on the 19thc edition of Zambrini, with some slight modifications. Since I cannot translate old Italian and have yet to find a translation of this particular manuscript, I am using the recipe found in The Medieval Kitchen: Recipes from France and Italy. Odile Redon, Francoise Sabban & Silvano Serventi, translated by Edward Schneider.

Shallot Tart[1]

 

2 lbs Onions and Shallots

250gr Pancetta

600gr Ricotta

Heavy Cream

2 Eggs

Saffron

 

3 cups Flour

14 tbsp Butter

6 tbsp Water

1 tsp Salt

 

A few hours in advance prepare the pate brisee.

 

Preheat oven to 400°.

 

Finely chop the pancetta in a food processor. Mince the onions. Combine the pancetta, onions, cheese, salt and eggs. Crush the saffron in.

 

Roll out pastry and blind bake tarts covered with foil for 10 mins and then 5 mins without the foil. Remove from oven and add filling and bake for an additional 30-50 mins checking to make sure it doesn’t burn.

(My Note: I did not chop the pancetta in the food processor as it would have been way too fine a chop for “Mr and Mrs Middle Ages Cook”. Because of the cost of shallots, I used about 25% Vidalia onions. )


[1] Le Menagier de Paris

The Medieval Kitchen: Recipes from France and Italy

Odile Redon, Francoise Sabban & Silvano Serventi, translated by Edward Schneider

Mackrons[1]

 

1 1/4 cup ground Almonds
1/4 cup Sugar
1 tsp Flour
2 Egg Whites
2 drops Rosewater or Vanilla
 

Mix the Almonds, sugar and flour together.

 

Beat the egg whites until a stiff peak forms. Fold in rosewater or vanilla and then fold this into the nuts. Drop onto parchment paper and bake in a 350° oven for about 15-20 mins, checking after 15. Makes about 25.

(My Note: I used Vanilla in place of the Rosewater as I cant stand it. Rosewater would have been used.)


[1] The accomplisht ladys delight in preserving, physick and cookery

Woolley, H., Plat, H., & Harris, T. (1675)

Eating Shakespeare, pg 194/195

Betty and Sonia Zyvatkauskas

Lasagne[1]

Cheese & Noodles

 

1 lb Broad Noodles (I use fresh lasagne sheets without the fluting along the edges)

1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan

1 cup or more Farmers Cheese, shredded (I use lots as I am a cheese freak)

2 tbsp or more Butter
 

Cut or break noodles to fit your pan. In large pot boil salted water and cook noodles until tender. In a serving dish that is oven safe (suggestion: spray with cooking spray if available), put a layer of pieces of butter and half the cheese, put noodles on top of this*. Add the second layer of butter and cheese**. Bake in 300º oven until hot.

 

(My Note: Mostly I just layer stuff until my dish is full. I tend to not use the butter as it makes this dish really greasy. The medieval directions are not as clear as we could wish, but it appears we are to weave groups of noodles into criss-cross lattice patterns. This is rather tedious but it’s worth it.)


[1] Liber de coquina

The Medieval Kitchen: Recipes from France and Italy

Odile Redon, Francoise Sabban & Silvano Serventi, translated by Edward Schneider

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Categories: Uncategorized

3 Comments

  1. Sounds delicious!
    Oh how i miss cooking with you!

    Maybe one day we can do it again!

    Hugs and loves
    Jullienne

    Like

  2. what is Pancetta and what is blind baking? sounds yummy

    Like

    • Pancetta is basically Italian bacon. It is formed round and is streaked with fat. I get it at the Italian shops here. You may also find it in the larger grocery stores deli’s(like Loblaws Superstores).

      Baking blind means that you bake the pastry with nothing in it. Like when you make a pudding pie, you bake the crust and then add the filling and refridgerate. The way I did the tarts was to use my big muffin tin, line with pastry and then I made little foil bags of dried kidney beans and put them in the lined muffin tin. If I want a crisper crust, I take the bean bags out 5-10 mins before finishing baking.

      ymmv.

      Like

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My Luncheon at Feast of the Hare – Recipes —

My Luncheon at Feast of the Hare – Recipes

Hiya all,

Here are the recipes I used for my lunch at Hare.

 

Civet of Hare[1]

Im cheating a little here and scanning the recipe rather than typing it.


(My Note: I didnt use the organ meats as I didnt see the point.)


[1] Libro della Cocina
Anonimo Toscano, late 14th c
E. Faccioli, Arte della cucina, Milano 1966
 
Note: The editor (Faccioli) considers this manuscript to be early 15thc. He goes on to say that that he fundamentally relies on the 19thc edition of Zambrini, with some slight modifications. Since I cannot translate old Italian and have yet to find a translation of this particular manuscript, I am using the recipe found in The Medieval Kitchen: Recipes from France and Italy. Odile Redon, Francoise Sabban & Silvano Serventi, translated by Edward Schneider.

Shallot Tart[1]

 

2 lbs Onions and Shallots

250gr Pancetta

600gr Ricotta

Heavy Cream

2 Eggs

Saffron

 

3 cups Flour

14 tbsp Butter

6 tbsp Water

1 tsp Salt

 

A few hours in advance prepare the pate brisee.

 

Preheat oven to 400°.

 

Finely chop the pancetta in a food processor. Mince the onions. Combine the pancetta, onions, cheese, salt and eggs. Crush the saffron in.

 

Roll out pastry and blind bake tarts covered with foil for 10 mins and then 5 mins without the foil. Remove from oven and add filling and bake for an additional 30-50 mins checking to make sure it doesn’t burn.

(My Note: I did not chop the pancetta in the food processor as it would have been way too fine a chop for “Mr and Mrs Middle Ages Cook”. Because of the cost of shallots, I used about 25% Vidalia onions. )


[1] Le Menagier de Paris

The Medieval Kitchen: Recipes from France and Italy

Odile Redon, Francoise Sabban & Silvano Serventi, translated by Edward Schneider

Mackrons[1]

 

1 1/4 cup ground Almonds
1/4 cup Sugar
1 tsp Flour
2 Egg Whites
2 drops Rosewater or Vanilla
 

Mix the Almonds, sugar and flour together.

 

Beat the egg whites until a stiff peak forms. Fold in rosewater or vanilla and then fold this into the nuts. Drop onto parchment paper and bake in a 350° oven for about 15-20 mins, checking after 15. Makes about 25.

(My Note: I used Vanilla in place of the Rosewater as I cant stand it. Rosewater would have been used.)


[1] The accomplisht ladys delight in preserving, physick and cookery

Woolley, H., Plat, H., & Harris, T. (1675)

Eating Shakespeare, pg 194/195

Betty and Sonia Zyvatkauskas

Lasagne[1]

Cheese & Noodles

 

1 lb Broad Noodles (I use fresh lasagne sheets without the fluting along the edges)

1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan

1 cup or more Farmers Cheese, shredded (I use lots as I am a cheese freak)

2 tbsp or more Butter
 

Cut or break noodles to fit your pan. In large pot boil salted water and cook noodles until tender. In a serving dish that is oven safe (suggestion: spray with cooking spray if available), put a layer of pieces of butter and half the cheese, put noodles on top of this*. Add the second layer of butter and cheese**. Bake in 300º oven until hot.

 

(My Note: Mostly I just layer stuff until my dish is full. I tend to not use the butter as it makes this dish really greasy. The medieval directions are not as clear as we could wish, but it appears we are to weave groups of noodles into criss-cross lattice patterns. This is rather tedious but it’s worth it.)


[1] Liber de coquina

The Medieval Kitchen: Recipes from France and Italy

Odile Redon, Francoise Sabban & Silvano Serventi, translated by Edward Schneider

Categories: Uncategorized

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